Behind The Headlines On Interest Rates

 

The Federal Reserve announced that economic factors “are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels for the federal funds rate at least through late 2014.”

This will, no doubt, influence interest rates through this period, but this is not the sole determinant of a company’s interest rate as noted in my post “Seems Smart Now“.

For example, the debt market for corporations, both large and small, is influenced by supply and demand factors in addition to the benchmark federal funds rate.  The predicted reduction in demand for corporate debt by collateralized loan obligation (CLO) funds suggests that companies may see higher new issue interest rates.  In contrast, any increase in demand by other lenders such as high yield bond and “relative value” investors may ease rates.

The recent post, “No Loan Left Behind“, by Randy Schwimmer of Churchill Middle Market Finance, now a unit of The Carlyle Group, describes these supply and demand forces at work on the larger size loan market (size above $100 million).

To support Randy’s view that high yield investors are supplying critical demand, this week one of my clients successfully priced its first high yield bond replacing other financing sources.

My message is that while Fed action gets the headlines, there are several other factors at work, behind the headlines, which influence a company’s debt rate.

Dennis McCarthy

(213) 222-8260

dennismccarthy@ariesmgmt.com

Offer Yield Securities – What Investors Want

dennismccarthy@ariesmgmt.com

(213) 222-8260

This is the second in a series of posts about how a company can best  respond to our current capital markets environment.

Frequently, our clients express their frustration that the equity market is so volatile now that investors seem reluctant to act.  Many investors are unsure whether they’ll get a positive return on their investment.

This has driven many to seek out securities with a yield, maybe interest on debt or a dividend on equity.

Seeing this, we’ve come up with a transaction which responds to investors’ current preferences.

We’ve advised companies to offer their common shareholders a new yield-oriented security in exchange for their common.

We’ve tailored the exchange offers to fit our client’s specific circumstances, there are a number of variations available.

The key is that our clients offer what is in great demand, a yield security, in exchange for what seems less in demand, plain common stock.

We’d be happy to discuss this idea with you to determine whether it works in your situation. 

Please call me or email me.  Thank you.

dennismccarthy@ariesmgmt.com

(213) 222-8260

Capitalmarketalerts.com

Living with No Growth

dennismccarthy@ariesmgmt.com

(213) 222-8260

Lately, I’ve been struggling with what it will mean to live in a world of slow to no growth.

First, I tried denial.   There can’t be a world without growth.

Pick up any company annual report or analyst research report, they always project growth.

It’s in our Wall Street DNA.

We need growth to cover our costs, to justify higher salaries, to reward our shareholders?

But, what if, as is now widely expected, we face a global slowdown for our near-term future?

How do we behave in a slow to no growth world?

We’re going to have to rethink many of our basic assumptions. Here are a couple which come to mind.

First, I think cost control will become more critical without revenue growth to bail us out.

Will this trigger a power shift in companies?  Will the path to become CEO now run through accounting?

Second, I think that, without growth, current cash flow is king.  There’ll be more skepticism about the promise of future cash flow.

Will this spark a rash of corporate acquisitions as large, cash-flowing companies gobble up companies with no or low cash flow?

On the financing front, with slow to no growth, will companies borrow more to get as much financial leverage as possible.

Or, will equity securities change?  Will we see more companies begin to pay dividends or do regular stock buybacks to pay a current return to their equity shareholders.

These are just a few ideas.  There are many more potential implications.

Please contact me to discuss the capital markets implications for your company.

My contact information is below. Thank you.

dennismccarthy@ariesmgmt.com

(213) 222-8260

Capitalmarketalerts.com

Slow Road Ahead

Living with slow to no growth